Dom Cobb

Dom Cobb

Mi­cro­bi­al Por­traits

We are at any time sur­roun­ded by bil­lions of mi­crobes, in­vis­ible to the hu­man eye. Most of them are not dan­ger­ous or even be­ne­fi­cial to us, but some can cause fa­tal dis­eases. My se­ries of pho­to­graphs are a visu­al study of this in­vis­ible world: por­traits of bac­te­ria and fun­gi.

Pro­cess

The sam­ples were col­lec­ted at 15 dif­fer­ent loc­a­tions, from pub­lic places to my own hand. Rath­er than "paint­ing" a path for the mi­crobes to grow on, they were de­lib­er­ately left to form their own shapes and pat­terns. De­pend­ing on where the first par­tic­les of a col­o­ny fall, ran­dom and high­ly di­verse struc­tures can form. There is a lit­tle more to the pro­cess, the de­tails of which re­main my se­cret. ;-) Many fac­tors con­trib­ute to the out­come of the ex­per­i­ment, for ex­ample the en­vir­on­ment where a cul­ture is grown in. While so-called aer­obic or­gan­isms thrive in an ox­y­gen-rich at­mo­sphere, an­aer­obes can­not sur­vive in such an en­vir­on­ment. Some or­gan­isms re­pro­duce faster than oth­ers. And dif­fer­ent mi­crobes need dif­fer­ent growth me­di­ums. Tem­per­at­ure also af­fects the res­ults. This is why Mi­cro­bi­al Por­traits are not an ob­ject­ive look at the mi­cro­cosm. To stress the ar­tist­ic as­pect the in­di­vidu­al pho­tos don't have la­bels. How­e­ver, if you are cu­ri­ous about where the sam­ples were taken from, here is a list:

  1. Hand
  2. Shoes
  3. Coins
  4. Train door
  5. Head­phones
  6. Vend­ing ma­chine
  7. Key­board
  8. Door knob
  9. Steer­ing wheel
  10. Keys

Düs­sel­dorf Pho­to

The work could be seen at the Düs­sel­dorf Pho­to fes­ti­val in Feb­ru­ary 2018. It was shown both as high-re­so­lu­tion prints and as a pho­to­book. Thanks to ev­ery­one who took the time to visit the ex­hib­i­tion! If you didn't get a chance to see my work in per­son you can con­tact me for a signed copy of my book.

Mi­cro­bi­al Por­traits

We are at any time sur­roun­ded by bil­lions of mi­crobes, in­vis­ible to the hu­man eye. Most of them are not dan­ger­ous or even be­ne­fi­cial to us, but some can cause fa­tal dis­eases. My se­ries of pho­to­graphs are a visu­al study of this in­vis­ible world: por­traits of bac­te­ria and fun­gi.

Pro­cess

The sam­ples were col­lec­ted at 15 dif­fer­ent loc­a­tions, from pub­lic places to my own hand. Rath­er than "paint­ing" a path for the mi­crobes to grow on, they were de­lib­er­ately left to form their own shapes and pat­terns. De­pend­ing on where the first par­tic­les of a col­o­ny fall, ran­dom and high­ly di­verse struc­tures can form. There is a lit­tle more to the pro­cess, the de­tails of which re­main my se­cret. ;-) Many fac­tors con­trib­ute to the out­come of the ex­per­i­ment, for ex­ample the en­vir­on­ment where a cul­ture is grown in. While so-called aer­obic or­gan­isms thrive in an ox­y­gen-rich at­mo­sphere, an­aer­obes can­not sur­vive in such an en­vir­on­ment. Some or­gan­isms re­pro­duce faster than oth­ers. And dif­fer­ent mi­crobes need dif­fer­ent growth me­di­ums. Tem­per­at­ure also af­fects the res­ults. This is why Mi­cro­bi­al Por­traits are not an ob­ject­ive look at the mi­cro­cosm. To stress the ar­tist­ic as­pect the in­di­vidu­al pho­tos don't have la­bels. How­e­ver, if you are cu­ri­ous about where the sam­ples were taken from, here is a list:

  1. Hand
  2. Shoes
  3. Coins
  4. Train door
  5. Head­phones
  6. Vend­ing ma­chine
  7. Key­board
  8. Door knob
  9. Steer­ing wheel
  10. Keys

Düs­sel­dorf Pho­to

The work could be seen at the Düs­sel­dorf Pho­to fes­ti­val in Feb­ru­ary 2018. It was shown both as high-re­so­lu­tion prints and as a pho­to­book. Thanks to ev­ery­one who took the time to visit the ex­hib­i­tion! If you didn't get a chance to see my work in per­son you can con­tact me for a signed copy of my book.